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Defining Brotherly Love, Part I

arthurwpinkArthur W. Pink

Brotherly love we would define as that gracious bond that knits together the hearts of God’s children. More definitely, it is that spiritual and affectionate solicitude1 that Christians have toward each other, manifested by a desiring and endeavoring after their highest mutual interests…2

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Wheat or Chaff

jc-ryle-hg-contJ. C. Ryle

Viewed with the eye of man, the earth contains many different sorts of inhabitants. Viewed with the eye of God, it only contains two. Man’s eye looks at the outward appearance: this is all he thinks of. The eye of God looks at the heart: this is the only part of which He takes any account. And tried by the state of their hearts, there are but two classes into which people can be divided: either they are wheat or they are chaff.

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Gospel Light Increases! John Newton, Letter 26/41

pastor-d-scott-meadowsD. Scott Meadows

Short and sweet, this 26th letter of Newton’s 41 on religious subjects responds to a likeminded brother, reveling in their mutual determination to know Christ better. Modern readers with the same godly desire will receive the most comfort from it.

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Christ’s New Commandment, Part II

© 1984 Adair

© 1984 Adair

Charles H. Spurgeon

I am bound as a man to love my fellow man because he is a man. But I am bound as a regenerate man to love my fellow Christian still more because he also is regenerate.

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The Day for Which All Other Days Were Made, Part II

william-s-plumerWilliam S. Plumer

The Day of Judgment will also be a day of great surprise, both to saints and sinners. So Christ expressly informs us: “Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee?” (Mat 25:37-39).

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Christ’s New Commandment, Part I

© 1984 Adair

© 1984 Adair

Charles H. Spurgeon

Many of you, I do not doubt, have heard the story of Arch-bishop Usher1 and Mr. Rutherford;2 but it is so appropriate to this subject that I cannot help telling it again. The archbishop had heard of the wondrous power of Rutherford’s devotion and of the singular beauty of the arrangement of his household, and he wished to witness it himself; but he could not tell how to do so until it occurred to him that he might disguise himself as a poor traveler.

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Who, indeed, can describe the pleasure with which the members of Christ’s flock do meet each other face to face? They may have been strangers before. They may have lived apart and never been in company; but it is wonderful to observe how soon they seem to understand each other. There seems a thorough oneness of opinion, taste, and judgment; so that a man would think they had known each other for years. They seem, indeed, to feel they are servants of one and the same Master, members of the same family, and have been converted by one and the same Spirit. They have one Lord, one faith, one baptism. They have the same trials, the same fears, the same doubts, the same temptations, the same faintings of heart, the same dread of sin, the same sense of unworthiness, the same love of their Savior. Oh, but there is a mystical union between true believers, which they only know who have experienced it. The world cannot understand it—it is all foolishness to them. But that union does really exist, and a most blessed thing it is; for it is like a little foretaste of heaven.

Beloved, this loving to be together is a special mark of Christ’s flock—nor is it strange, if we consider they are walking in the same narrow way and fighting against the same deadly enemies—and never are they so happy as when they are in company. The unconverted know nothing of such happiness.

—J. C. Ryle (1816-1900)

“If the holy anger of the Lord Jesus was stirred when He beheld the profanation of that House which was to be a ‘house of prayer,’ if the idolatrous commercialization of it caused Him to cleanse it in such a drastic manner, how must He now regard many of the edifices which have been consecrated to His name! How tragically does history repeat itself! The things which are now done in so many churchhouses—the ice cream suppers, the bazaars, the moving picture shows, and other forms of entertainment—what are these but idolatrous commercialization of these ‘houses of prayer’? No wonder that such places are devoid of spirituality and strangers to the power of God. The Lord will not tolerate an unholy mixture of worldly things with spiritual.” —A. W. Pink
“Men must read, if their ministry is not to become threadbare, thin, and a mere repetition of hackneyed commonplaces. Always taking
out of their minds and never putting in, they must naturally come to the bottom. Reading alone will make a full man.” —J.C. Ryle

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